Hawaii waste disposal bill could impact Aloha Stadium demolition

The bill would require at least a half-mile buffer zone around residences, schools and hospitals for the construction, modification or expansion of a waste or disposal facility.

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A state Senate bill that would require a buffer zone around waste disposal facilities could impact the demolition and clearance of Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii, reports The Eagle.

Waianae, Hawaii-based PVT Land Co. president and CEO Albert Shigemura says the company would be unable to accept material from the stadium at its landfill and recycling facility if the bill is approved, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported June 14.

The bill, which is part of a Senate Native Hawaiian Caucus package, would require at least a half-mile buffer zone around residences, schools and hospitals for the construction, modification or expansion of a waste or disposal facility. The bill would also prohibit the location of a disposal facility in a conservation district, except under emergency circumstances.

According to The Eagle, the 50,000-seat Aloha Stadium is expected to be demolished following the opening of a new stadium in September 2023. The state allocated up to $350 million for the construction, with additional private funds anticipated.

PVT Land operates the only public construction and demolition landfill and recycling facility on Oahu and the site in Nanakuli is expected to reach capacity in five years, Shigemura said. The company is seeking approval to expand to an adjacent site with a buffer of 750 feet (229 meters) on its southern boundary. The facility could have an operational life of 30 years.

Some environmental and Hawaii community organizations, including the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, support the bill.

The Sierra Club said residents have reported health issues related to exposure to landfill pollution, dust debris, asbestos and other chemicals, while U.S. Census data shows life expectancy in Nanakuli is 10 years less than the state average.

Nine studies conducted on dust from PVT’s property failed to find health hazards, Shigemura said.