Construction cracks top 5 most deadly industries list

Construction cracks top 5 most deadly industries list

In 2019, fatalities in the private construction industry increased 5 percent to 1,061—the largest total since 2007.

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December 17, 2020

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) released its 2019 National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries report on Dec. 16. The report shows that fatalities in the private construction industry in 2019 increased 5 percent to 1,061—the largest total since 2007. In the four years prior, fatalities ranged from 937 in 2015, 991 in 2016, 971 in 2017 and 1,008 in 2018.

Fatalities in combined construction and extraction occupations increased by 6 percent in 2019 to 1,066, which was also the largest total since 2007. Within the construction and extraction occupation subgroup, supervisors of construction and extraction workers accounted for 136 deaths in 2019, while construction trades workers amassed 809 deaths and extraction workers accounted for 50 deaths.

The fatal work injury rate per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers in construction was 40, which vaulted the industry over refuse and recyclable material collectors to become the fifth most deadly job. Fishing and hunting workers were ranked as the No. 1 most deadly occupation with a fatal injury rate of 145, followed by logging workers at 68.9, aircraft pilots and flight engineers at 61.8 and roofers at 54. The fatal injury rate for all workers on the 2019 National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries list was 3.5