Home News Oregon DEQ Seeks Comments on Permit for Shingle Recycler

Oregon DEQ Seeks Comments on Permit for Shingle Recycler

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Northwest Shingle Recycler plans to build MRF that would recycle asphalt shingles generated by commercial roofers.

CDR Staff August 13, 2013

The state of Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is seeking comments on a proposed solid waste permit for Northwest Shingle Recycler’s Material Recovery Facility (MRF), to be built in Portland.

If approved, the facility would accept residential roofing waste from commercial roofers. All incoming loads would be tipped, sorted and stored inside a building. Asphalt shingles would be separated from the other waste and shipped to an asphalt batch plant, where they would become a feedstock for new asphalt. All other materials would be recycled to the greatest extent possible.

Materials that can’t be recycled would be sent to a permitted landfill for disposal. The facility would not be open to the general public. The roofing waste would consist of asphalt shingles, wood shingles, felt paper, nails, and tar paper. Other construction and demolition debris such as vent covers, metal flashing, roof joists and fascia boards may be included in the incoming material. The facility will not accept material containing asbestos, infectious wastes, batteries, used oil, liquid waste, putrescible wastes or hazardous wastes.

The DEQ says that the facility does not need any other DEQ permits to operate, but will need a MRF license from Metro Portland.

Additionally, the facility may dispose of asphalt shingles at an asphalt drum plant that has DEQ air and water quality approvals. Northwest Shingle Recyclers already operates two similar permitted facilities, one in southeast Portland and one in Tigard, Ore.

Comments for the public record can be sent to: Holly Pence, Solid Waste Permit Coordinator, DEQ Northwest Region 2020 SW 4th Ave, Suite 400 Portland, OR 97201 or by email at pence.holly@deq.state.or.us. Comments are due by Sept. 9, 2013.
 

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