Taiwan to face exported steel duties

Taiwan to face exported steel duties

U.S. Department of Commerce rules that Taiwanese rebar has been sold at below-market prices.

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July 26, 2017
Recycling Today Staff
Commodities Construction Legislation & Regulations Metals

United States Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross has announced an “affirmative final determination” in an antidumping duty (AD) investigation, finding that steel reinforcing bar (rebar, used to reinforce concrete) from Taiwan has been sold into the U.S. market at unfair prices.

 

The Commerce Department determined that exporters from Taiwan have sold rebar in the U.S. at from 3.5 percent to 32 percent less than “fair value,” based on what it calls “factual evidence provided by the interested parties.”

 

The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of rebar from Taiwan based on these final rates.

 

“The United States can no longer sit back and watch as its essential industries like steel are destroyed by foreign companies unfairly selling their products in the U.S. markets,” says Ross. “We will continue to take action on behalf of U.S. industry to defend American businesses, their workers, and our communities adversely impacted by unfair imports.”

 

In 2016, imports of steel concrete reinforcing bar from Taiwan were valued at an estimated $53 million.

 

The Rebar Trade Action Coalition filed the case with the Commerce Department on behalf of its individual members, several of whom operate scrap-fed electric arc furnace steel mills, including:

  • Commercial Metals Co., Irving, Texas;
  • Gerdau Ameristeel U.S. Inc., Tampa, Florida;
  • Nucor Corp., Charlotte, North Carolina;
  • Steel Dynamics Inc., Fort Wayne, Indiana; and
  • Byer Steel Group Inc., Cincinnati.

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is investigating to determine whether the domestic steel industry is being harmed by imports of rebar from Taiwan. The ITC is currently scheduled to make its final injury determination on or before Sept. 5, 2017.

 

If the ITC makes an affirmative final injury determination, the Commerce Department says it will issue an antidumping order. If the ITC makes a negative final injury determination, the investigation will be terminated and no order will be issued.